Biobanking Management Systems


Manage the storage, retrieval and management biospecimens and bio-samples.

Biorepository management systems allow the storage and retrieval of biospecimens, and associated data, to exacting regulatory requirements. Biorepositories are a key element in a growing number of organizations in biotechnology, pharmaceutical and medical research. They require tight regulation and security as they contain bio-samples from patient biopsy, surgery or other procedures, often with associated patient data including their medical conditions and background.


Matrix Gemini Biobanking provides the ideal solution for managing bio-samples (such as blood, tissue, DNA etc.) to assist with compliance to the regulatory requirements. Samples are tracked at all times, along with the complete patient genealogy record, if required, while aliquots, pooled samples and derivatives of each sample may be associated and closely monitored.

The configurabilityof Matrix Gemini Biobanking means that it can be configured and re-configured to meet both current and future requirements without the need to write "one-off" custom code. The use of this standard but configurable solution means that the potential life of the system is extended and the cost of ownership reduced.

Key Biobanking Features:

  • Comply with the regulatory requirements, such as HTA, GCLP, MHRA and national regulations
  • Manage sample logging and patient records with ease
  • Keep patient identity separate, if desired
  • Quickly record and move storage location of samples or batch of samples
  • Track biospecimens when removed for research, to ensure chain-of-custody records
  • Ensure all samples, aliquots, etc. are closely monitored and disposed of correctly
  • Eliminate lost samples and compromised sample integrity
  • Easily adapt to accommodate changing business requirements
  • Improve efficiency and reduce costs via time savings for many tasks

Find Out More

For more detailed information see our Matrix Gemini for Biobanking brochure

Case Study

Roy Castle Cancer Research